Donations? Here’s where you can give items A-Z to those in need.




Often times I get asked where to donate some specific items. I've put together a running alphabetical list of places that are accepting donations of all kinds. Since I am a Minnesota Girl, I tried to include as many local organizations in my list. My list is forever growing so if you know of a great specific place to donate items to let me know and will get this added.

ART PROJECTS MATERIALS

Artscraps in St Paul (St Clair and Snelling Ave) will take items that could be used for any type of art or craft project, from metal scraps to margarine tubs. 651-698-ARTS or www.artstart.org. In Minneapolis, Funktional Art will take similar objects. Also try your local Parks and Rec to donate anything that could be used for art projects for children. Also try the Science Museum of Minnesota.

Leonardo’s Basement in Minneapolis accepts items for their kids’ classes and projects, everything from prescription bottles to art supplies, from hand tools to gadgets. Visit http://leonardosbasement.org or call (612) 824-4394.


BABY ITEMS

Birthright in St Paul accepts donations of infant clothing (0 – 3T), baby toys, and strollers. Call 651-646-7033.

Bundles of Love Charity accepts sewing material; cotton or cotton-blend knit fabric, cotton woven fabric, polar fleece, sweatshirt fleece, ribbing, bias tape, elastic, fiberfill, yarn (non-wool), and new baby care supplies of newborn diapers, baby wipes, baby wash. Visit www.bundlesoflove.org or call (952) 808-6882 to leave a message.

Joseph’s Coat accepts clothing, bedding, baby toys, and strollers in good condition. Visit www.josephscoatmn.org or call 651-291-2472.

Tapestry at Chicago Ave South and 41st Street in Minneapolis accepts donations of infant and toddler clothing, car seats, and strollers. They are one of the few places that takes older cribs (no more than 10 years old) as they have volunteers who refurbish them and get them up to safety standards. Call 612-823-0301 or visit www.tapestryfamilies.org.

TLC Options for Women affiliated pregnancy resource centers in West St Paul, St. Paul Midway, Little Canada, East St Paul, Highland, Apple Valley, Hastings, Woodbury, North Minneapolis, Hopkins, Osseo, Forest Lake, Stillwater and Lindstrom accept cribs (no drop- down sides), infant clothing (newborn– 3T), and strollers. Call 651-291-9473 or find a center near you at www.tlcoptions.org.

TwinCitiesFreeMarket.org will let you post items for free in the children’s section. Visit www.TwinCitiesFreeMarket.org.

BATTERIES

Radio Shack and Target will take back used small button batteries used in watches, hearing aids, cameras, etc. These should NOT be thrown in the trash. Service stations are required to take back automotive lead acid batteries. Rechargeable batteries, such as those for cell phones and cordless power tools, should NOT be thrown in the trash. Visit www.call2recycle.org for a list of retailers who accept them, including Target, Radio Shack, and Home Depot. Common alkaline batteries used in toys and flashlights CAN be thrown in the trash as they don’t contain any mercury.


BIKES

Mr. Michael Recycles Bicycles, 520 N. Prior Avenue in St. Paul, accepts used bicycles in any condition. Especially needed are bicycles to fit tall men. The store is open limited hours; the schedule is listed on the calendar on their web site at www.mmrbstore.com or call 651-641-1037. Pick-up available for 10 or more bicycles in the metro area.

BOOKS

Minnesota Literacy Council accepts new and gently used bilingual and multicultural children’s books; board books for early readers and preschoolers; picture books; easy chapter books; and middle grades chapter books. These books are given to low-income children and families. Visit www.mnliteracy.org/support/book-donations for details.

Read Indeed accepts new and gently used books at its warehouse in Hopkins, Minnesota. The warehouse is open two Saturdays a month. These books are given to low-income children and families. Visit www.mnliteracy.org/support/book-donations for details.

Books for Africa has a drop off site in St Paul. These books are sent to rural school libraries, orphanages, and adult literacy programs throughout Africa. Details at www.booksforafrica.org.

CARS

Make-a-Wish Foundation accepts all vehicles, running or not. Free pick-up. Call 651-645-9474 or visit www.wheelsforwishes.org.

Autos for Arc accepts any vehicle — car, truck, boat w/trailer, motorcycle, snowmobile, ATV, or RV — in any condition, with free pickup. Vehicles are sold at auction, and proceeds help individuals with disabilities and their families. Call 1-877-778-7709 or visit www.autosforarc.org.

Courage Center: The program accepts passenger cars, SUVs, light trucks, vans, trucks, RV/campers, boats, snowmobiles, motorcycles, and personal watercraft. Vehicles must be less than 14 years old. They must be in safe driving condition and have good resale value. Visit www.couragecenter.org or call 763-520-0520.

Free To Be, Inc., part of Anoka County Community Coalition, accepts vehicles at their Blaine location. They inspect and repair the cars, then donate them to needy families. Visit www.freetobeinc.org or call 763-717-7755.

New Gate School Your car donation to Newgate has local and immediate impact. The proceeds from your car, and often the car itself, are used to help train unemployed or under-employed adults for high-demand careers as auto body technicians and auto mechanics. As part of their training, students refurbish cars and vans, which are then sold. Those dollars alone fund our automotive school's operations and career-training programs.

Goodwill accepts vehicles in any condition, including automobiles, RVs, snowmobiles, campers, motorcycles and boats. Visit GoodwillCarDonation.org/car-donation-minnesota to schedule a free pick up.

Vehicle For Vets MN accepts cars, trucks, boats (with trailer), motorcycles, and RVs, with free pick up. Call 1-844-234-2328 or donate your car online at www.vehiclesforveterans.org.


CELL PHONES

Best Buy provides free and easy recycling for any brand of cell phone.

The AT&T Wireless Reuse & Recycle Programaccepts free drop-offs of all brands of unwanted cell phones and accessories at AT&T Wireless retail stores.

Sprint Project Connect offers free drop-off of all brands of wireless phones at Sprint Stores.

Staples office supply stores offer free drop-off recycling services for used cell phones.

Target stores offer free drop-off recycling services for used cell phones.

Through the Verizon Wireless HopeLine Phone Recycling Program, consumers get free drop-off recycling services for used cell phones at retail store locations.

Many local schools accept cell phones as a fundraiser.

CLOTHING

Caring Heart In Action is a community clothes closet (and food shelf). It is located in Farmington , MN.

Ready for Success, part of Episcopal Community Services, provides low-income women and men in the Twin Cities with gently used clothing suitable for interviews and the workplace. They especially need “business professional” and” business casual” items in sizes 14 and higher, plus shoes, scaves, jewelry, watches, purses, belts, seasonal outwear, bras, slips, and camisoles. Call 651-731-6400 or visit http://readyforsuccessmn.org.

Dress For Success aims to advance low-income women’s economic and social development and to encourage self-sufficiency through career development and employment retention. Dress for Success currently accepts new or nearly-new and cleaned: Coordinated, contemporary, interview-appropriate skirt and pant suits; crisp blouses; blazers and jackets; and professional shoes. They are particularly in need of larger-size suits. Visit www.dressforsuccess.org.

Operation Glass Slipper collects gently used prom dresses and distributes them to Twin Cities high school students who can’t afford new dresses. They need your shoes and accessories, too. Visit www.operationglassslipper.org.

Paperbag Princess in South St Paul is collecting dresses. Visit http://paperbagprincess.org for details.

Community Recycling is the perfect option if you don’t have a local donation resource. Simply gather up your gently used clothing (no heavy winter coats), bags, belts and shoes (no flip flops, slippers, winter boots or crocs). Box them up. Then, visit the website at www.communityrecycling.biz/programs/cr-home to print out a pre-paid shipping label. After they receive your boxes they will record your recycling activity to your online recycling dashboard, where you can track your recycled items and view your environmental impact.

COMPUTERS/ ELECTRONICS

Best Buy (locations nationwide) accepts and recycles a variety of tech items at no charge, including computers, printers, keyboards, tablets, e-readers, laptop batteries, gaming systems, TVs, DVD players, video cameras, GPS, speakers, CDs, DVDs, Blu-Rays, vacuums, and so much more. Visit www.bestbuy.com and search for “recycling.”

MNTAP materials exchange helps prevent usable business materials from becoming waste. Visit www.mnexchange.org or call 612-624-5119.

Minnesota Computers for Schools refurbishes relatively new (and working) computers for classrooms. Call 651-779-2700 ext 2656 or visit www.mncfs.org.

Computer Service Center in Blaine offers free recycling of computers, printer cartridges/toner, keyboards, computer mice, speakers, power cords, radios, headphones, external computer devices, stereos, and software. There is a minimal charge to recycle printers, copiers, scanners, TVs, and monitors. Drop off or arrange pick up. Will remove hard drive information safely for you. Call 763-783-8600 or visit www.computerservicemn.com.

Jobs Foundation offers free electronics recycling of all computer-related and electronics items such as keyboards, mice, routers, servers, cables, cords, printers, cell phones, flat-screen monitors, and fax machines, plus stereos, speakers, and radios. No microwaves. (There is a fee for CRT monitors and televisions). Drop off. Complimentary pick-up for at least ten computers. Call 763-432-3117 or visit www.techdump.org.

PCs for People refurbishes used computers (10 years or newer) and distributes them to low-income families and 501(c)(3) non-profits. They have o